install theme
Sep 14, 2014
Ñ Feb. 10, 1899, Charles Henry, Lou Henry Hoover, Jean Henry, Herbert Hoover and Florence Henry. Monterey, CA, Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover’s wedding day.

Feb. 10, 1899, Charles Henry, Lou Henry Hoover, Jean Henry, Herbert Hoover and Florence Henry. Monterey, CA, Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover’s wedding day.

(Source: hoover.archives.gov)

6 
6
    1
h
5
Aug 12, 2014
Ñ My my George W Bush that is quite the large snowman you have constructed

My my George W Bush that is quite the large snowman you have constructed

6 
6
    5
h
5
Aug 12, 2014
theycallmegomer:

This is another one of those mysterious books that lives on my bookshelf. I have lots of them, by the way. Books I don’t remember purchasing, nor how else they get there except through a magic portal. 
Its not that I wouldn’t have bought this book for myself- but it’s unlikely. As much as I love U.S. History, excepting William Howard Taft, I don’t have a lot of love for presidential history. Like military history, it has been beat to death with scholars and popular historians and amateurs.
I was on my way out somewhere, anticipating a delay, and grabbed this to kill time. I finished it three days later.
The book has its faults, but entertaining is not one of them. Angelo uses anecdotes (usually filtered through family members and given heroic proportions) to tell us of the relationships between “post-modern” history’s presidents and their mothers. The book very much worships the cult of motherhood and if it wasn’t marketed as a Mother’s Day gift, someone should be fired. All of that withstanding, though, it is still easy vignettes of these presidents as children.
Angelo also does a fantastic job of singling out one trait of the mother and showcasing it in her son. With Roosevelt is was his sense noblisse oblige; Truman it was the need to be charitable when you are the victor; Eisenhower it was the importance of self-reliance; Kennedy it was the drive to be successful through honest means; Johnson it was the importance of education; Nixon perseverance in the face of misfortune; Ford learned strength and honesty- and how both are their own reward; Carter learned equality and a love for the underdog; Reagen learned optimism; Bush 41 learned compromise and humility; Clinton learned to place any- and all- criticism and adversity in a box, and succeed in spite of it; George W. Bush learned of family and loyalty and what would be called chivalrous values.
Angelo draws striking parallels between all of these mothers- the traits that all of them shared, even though none of them had similar backgrounds. All of them were the pets of their fathers; all had been “excessively” educated as dictated by the standards of their time; all (excepting Barbara Bush) had weak-willed husbands- if not out-right failures- and shined as the head of their households. (In the case of Rose Kennedy, it was Joe Kennedy’s broken moral compass that allowed her the title.) All of them favored the son that became president, even from an early age; oftentimes, as was the case with Lyndon Johnson, treated their son as a surrogate (not sexually) husband and father to their siblings.
By the time you’re finished, though, you realize you have failed to set your child on the path to the White House unless you started before they were out of diapers. The book- owing a lot to its size, each bio less than 5000 words- does not take anything else into account. All that is good about these men, Bonnie Angelo traces to their mothers- their own wits, drive or “lucky breaks” has very little to do with it.
I read it, though, and I recommend it if you are at all interested in history and need something for the plane. You will quickly read through it, and you will, most likely, feel a little nostalgia for your mother.

theycallmegomer:

This is another one of those mysterious books that lives on my bookshelf. I have lots of them, by the way. Books I don’t remember purchasing, nor how else they get there except through a magic portal. 

Its not that I wouldn’t have bought this book for myself- but it’s unlikely. As much as I love U.S. History, excepting William Howard Taft, I don’t have a lot of love for presidential history. Like military history, it has been beat to death with scholars and popular historians and amateurs.

I was on my way out somewhere, anticipating a delay, and grabbed this to kill time. I finished it three days later.

The book has its faults, but entertaining is not one of them. Angelo uses anecdotes (usually filtered through family members and given heroic proportions) to tell us of the relationships between “post-modern” history’s presidents and their mothers. The book very much worships the cult of motherhood and if it wasn’t marketed as a Mother’s Day gift, someone should be fired. All of that withstanding, though, it is still easy vignettes of these presidents as children.

Angelo also does a fantastic job of singling out one trait of the mother and showcasing it in her son. With Roosevelt is was his sense noblisse oblige; Truman it was the need to be charitable when you are the victor; Eisenhower it was the importance of self-reliance; Kennedy it was the drive to be successful through honest means; Johnson it was the importance of education; Nixon perseverance in the face of misfortune; Ford learned strength and honesty- and how both are their own reward; Carter learned equality and a love for the underdog; Reagen learned optimism; Bush 41 learned compromise and humility; Clinton learned to place any- and all- criticism and adversity in a box, and succeed in spite of it; George W. Bush learned of family and loyalty and what would be called chivalrous values.

Angelo draws striking parallels between all of these mothers- the traits that all of them shared, even though none of them had similar backgrounds. All of them were the pets of their fathers; all had been “excessively” educated as dictated by the standards of their time; all (excepting Barbara Bush) had weak-willed husbands- if not out-right failures- and shined as the head of their households. (In the case of Rose Kennedy, it was Joe Kennedy’s broken moral compass that allowed her the title.) All of them favored the son that became president, even from an early age; oftentimes, as was the case with Lyndon Johnson, treated their son as a surrogate (not sexually) husband and father to their siblings.

By the time you’re finished, though, you realize you have failed to set your child on the path to the White House unless you started before they were out of diapers. The book- owing a lot to its size, each bio less than 5000 words- does not take anything else into account. All that is good about these men, Bonnie Angelo traces to their mothers- their own wits, drive or “lucky breaks” has very little to do with it.

I read it, though, and I recommend it if you are at all interested in history and need something for the plane. You will quickly read through it, and you will, most likely, feel a little nostalgia for your mother.

6 
6
    5
h
5
Aug 11, 2014

shrinkwrappedpackets:

historgasm:

gameraboy:

On August 11, 1955. Vice President Richard M. Nixon visited Disneyland with his wife Patricia Nixon and his daughters Tricia and Julie Nixon. Via the USC Digital Library. More vintage Disney.

I gotta hope whoever put Nixon in that “Dopey” car did it on purpose.

Oh Nixon look at you this is precious

6 
6
    164
h
5
Aug 11, 2014
Well alright then

Well alright then

6 
6
    6
h
5
Aug 07, 2014

Richard Nixon, wannabe rapper

On an audiotape at the Nixon Presidential Library (even after leaving the Oval Office, he couldn’t shake his habit of recording every thought) he is found to say for all of posterity, ”I have often thought that if there had been a good rap group around in those days, I might have chosen a career in music instead of politics.”

Click, read, enjoy life

(Source: Washington Post)

6 
6
    5
h
5
Aug 03, 2014

http://wrathofthegiraffe.tumblr.com/post/89114550138/just-a-friendly-reminder-that-when-john-quincy

wrathofthegiraffe:

Just a friendly reminder that when John Quincy Adams was president, he tried to force Congress to fund an expedition to the center of the earth because he believed the earth was hollow. He thought that if we could get there, we would find mole people. Mole people we could trade with.

So any time…

6 
6
    10
h
5
Aug 02, 2014
Ñ williemckay:


 ”Kennedy disliked photos that showed any public display of affection. ‘Once in New York City he was greeted at the airport by Jack, who kissed him on arrival, but we missed the photo because of a lot of maneuvering on Kennedy’s part. He was supposed to get off the front of the plane but instead he ran out the back where he met Jackie and kissed her quickly. We all made a mad dash and started screaming, ‘Kiss her again, Senator.’ ‘C’mon, Mrs. Kennedy. Hug him.’ ‘Senator, we need a kiss!’ JFK looked at us and smiled. ‘You’re sure an affectionate group of photographers.’” 
"Even after his inaugural address Kennedy did not kiss his wife, which is why she later told Stanley she loved the photograph he had taken of the them in a convertible returning from Blair House to the White House. The picture shows the President reaching over to tenderly brush hair out of her face. ‘It’s my favorite picture of the two of us,’ she said, ‘because it shows such great affection.’"
"Stanley recollected that as a candidate ‘Kennedy will not pose for any picture which he thinks smacks of corn. As his good friend Joe Alsop says, ‘Two things make him nervous—nuns and silly hats.’"

Capturing Camelot: Stanley Tretick’s Iconic Images of the Kennedys

williemckay:

 ”Kennedy disliked photos that showed any public display of affection. ‘Once in New York City he was greeted at the airport by Jack, who kissed him on arrival, but we missed the photo because of a lot of maneuvering on Kennedy’s part. He was supposed to get off the front of the plane but instead he ran out the back where he met Jackie and kissed her quickly. We all made a mad dash and started screaming, ‘Kiss her again, Senator.’ ‘C’mon, Mrs. Kennedy. Hug him.’ ‘Senator, we need a kiss!’ JFK looked at us and smiled. ‘You’re sure an affectionate group of photographers.’” 

"Even after his inaugural address Kennedy did not kiss his wife, which is why she later told Stanley she loved the photograph he had taken of the them in a convertible returning from Blair House to the White House. The picture shows the President reaching over to tenderly brush hair out of her face. ‘It’s my favorite picture of the two of us,’ she said, ‘because it shows such great affection.’"

"Stanley recollected that as a candidate ‘Kennedy will not pose for any picture which he thinks smacks of corn. As his good friend Joe Alsop says, ‘Two things make him nervous—nuns and silly hats.’"


Capturing Camelot: Stanley Tretick’s Iconic Images of the Kennedys

(via lancer-lace)

6 
6
    161
h
5
^
è